Of Course It’s My Fault

This story is far enough in my past now, I can finally tell it.  To give some background, I was working at a university doing desktop support.  THAT ALONE probably fills a few of you with dread.  But to be specific, I was working for the nice folks in Dewey Hall.  I say “nice folks” because they had the decency to hire me and set aside some of their budget for my salary.  The deal was, I worked for them, but if my schedule allowed, I was to help out at the neighboring buildings, Screwem Hall and Howe Hall.  Those buildings contributed nothing to IT and basically got free support.

I get a call over to Screwem Hall, and a tearful lady tells me that her “backup drive” isn’t working.  Because this isn’t technically my building, I have no idea what she’s talking about.

It turns out that, years ago, before my time, before my co-worker’s time, before my boss’s time, in fact, before anyone I knew actually worked there, someone had set this lady up with a four-disc RAID-1 array.  A bad storm had come through during the night, and this morning… it no workeez.  Bear in mind, at this point, you readers know more than I did while this lady is breaking into hysterics about her years of lost work.

“It was supposed to be automatically backed up!  That’s the entire purpose of that thing!  And it’s supposed to do it automatically, I’ve never had to touch it!  YEARS OF WORK ON THERE!  IF IT’S LOST I’M GOING TO COLLAPSE!”

Again, this is not my territory and in all my time here, no one ever alerted me to this drive’s existence.  So, I sit down and try to assess the situation… and as you’d all agree, the ideal time to analyze a system is NOT after it’s already had a massive failure.

…Turns out, this is a four-bay enclosure, with four 1TB drives, configured into a 2TB drive with a 2TB redundancy drive.     Obviously, if a disk failed, the data could be reconstructed from the redundancy drive.

…Except it wasn’t one disc that had failed, it was two.  So her chances of success now hinge on the failed drives NOT having the same data.  I decided to look into this possibility.

…Except that the array’s management software hadn’t been loaded onto this computer, since the array had been there so long the user had replaced their computer in the meantime, and no one but the original tech even knew the management software existed.  So I decide to access the menu of the drive directly.

…Except it’s a painful cluster of menus, and I’m afraid to even turn the damn thing off and on, for fear of making any data corruption worse than it already is.  The only thing I CAN tell is that it’s set to automatically rebuild, so if the data is all still on there, it’ll go into auto-pilot mode.

So I tell her the short version: that her main chance of success is to hope this thing works as designed.  I tell her to go buy me two appropriate-sized drives and let me install them.  She does so, I install them, and I get nothing.  No data comes back.

RAID LADY LOSES HER FUCKING MIND.  

There are words.  There are noises.  There are screams.  There are tears.  And that’s just for starters.  She calls my boss, reports me, announces a vendetta against our whole department.  Without even blinking an eye, I calmly list the following:

I had no idea this device existed in our environment, therefore, I had never been able to do any preventative maintenance on it.

Whoever set it up set it up in a highly questionable manner.  First, they did not put it on a UPS, which made the electrical damage from the storm that much more likely.  That was stupid.

Second, they used double the number of hard drives needed to achieve the space needed.  Even years ago, 2TB hard drives weren’t that expensive, least of all if you’re charging them to an academic budget.  By doubling the number of disks, he doubled the potential points of failure.  Stupid.

Third, all the hard drives were the same model and from the same batch, indicating if one had a manufacturing flaw, the others would suffer the same flaw, multiplying the potential for failure.  Stupid.

Fourth, all the hard drives were original to the installation.  None had been replaced proactively.  So all were out of warranty and well past their expected time to fail.  Stupid.

Fifth, the software suite which MIGHT have alerted this lady to the fact that her drives were in bad shape OR that her backups weren’t being done was never installed.  GOD DAMN FUCKING STUPID.

…But no, it’s apparently MY FAULT her data is gone.  Because I couldn’t fix the magic drive that was supposed to never break.

Microsoft says i have 128000 malware and i should call them….,

Got  a message from one of my customers. He says his computer shut down and then gave him a message saying he has 128000 pieces of malware and he needs toc all Microsoft. Now this user instead of calling me went and paid for it despite my always telling him not to fall for these things. I of course called hm back and tld him to power down the pc in hopes it gets them out! Now he is calling his credit card company to report the fraud. Lesson #1 always call your computer guy first!  SMH

When do i get my new computer

I installed a new computer for a customer to replace their 6+ year old desktop. It’s clearly a different computer a full sized tower compared tot he micro they had before and it has Win 10 as opposed to Win7. I get done setting it up (join to domain, have user log in etc) and the user turns to me and asks when she is getting her new computer. I’m like this is your new computer… her comment was then why isnt my screen bigger. Turns out she wanted a new monitor with the pc and they didn’t order one for her.

Phone-Induced Amnesia

CaffeineHead here, old soldier from back in the days of the site, back then a wide-eyed young pup, now a cynical old fart. In the ensuing years since the site, I’ve lost one wife, gained another, went from having two cute little kids to being Dad to two young adults and one sweet little toddler through whom I cling to the notion that there is still some good in the world.

I also don’t deal with the general public anymore, but work an internal IT position where I speak solely to company employees, which makes the following situation even more head-shake worthy.

Presumably, these people use their computers every day. They log into their accounts, launch their apps, check their email, yada yada yada. They know instinctively how to do everything they need to do on their systems to the point where they could do it in their sleep.

Until, that is, something breaks, and they have to call IT. Then, suddenly, they forget how to do anything without explicit instructions. I mean, even on stuff they do every day.

Me: Okay, I’ve killed your citrix session and it looks like the new one launched successfully. Here, I’ll open your [Citrix App] for you. Can you put your password in please?

Starfish: What’s my password?

Me: Whatever one you use to login to [Citrix App].

Starfish: I…I don’t think I know what it is…

Me: What do you put in there when you first launch the app every day?

Starfish: …I…um…can’t you put it in?

Me: We don’t store your passwords as doing so would be a breach of security.

Starfish: Well, I really can’t remember. Can you login for me?

And the song and dance starts again with any other thing I have them check. And $deity forbid I need them to reboot, especially if I plan on getting reconnected to their screen.

Sophia, Just Be Glad I Didn’t Puke On You (long)

Every morning, I have the same argument with myself: am I going to get out of bed and do the responsible thing, go to work, and earn my paycheck, or will I do what I WANT to do and call in sick so I can get some more sleep?  And every morning, there is a period of about three seconds where the latter has a very strong chance of winning out.  And yet, somehow, nearly every morning the responsible side wins out, and by the time I get out of bed and start putting in my contacts, I resolve myself into saying “Okay, we’re going to do this one more day.”

You’d think that would be a good thing.  Sometimes, however, the “Fuck ’em All” half needs to be respected, for tragedy can strike when he is not.  This is one of those times when I should have listened to “Mr. Fuck ’em All”.

I roll into the office at 8 AM sharp, with nothing particularly unusual to note that morning.  As I’d planned the previous day, I was going to do a job in the next city over (2 hour drive) and so I load my tools into the company car and head off.  With 2 hours in the saddle each way, and needing to have the car back at 5PM sharp, I’m looking at five productive hours once I arrive, so every minute is going to be precious if I’m going to get this done.  This is a run I make all the time, with the same schedule, and I have it down to a science… my next step is to grab a McDonald’s drive-thru breakfast, which will give me enough protein and calories to get through the day (working through lunch) so that I don’t get hungry.

I pass the midway point on the turnpike and suddenly start feeling a bit chilled.  Then sweaty.  Then achy.  And suddenly, I really want my bed.  At best, I think, maybe my allergies are messing with me, but I strongly suspect I have a flu setting in.  This is when I really, really wish I’d just called in and stayed home, but who was to know this would end up being the day I actually needed to take it easy?  I could have turned around and headed home there, but at this point, I was already much closer to the destination than I was to my house, and as the minutes went on, I wanted to stop, get out of the car, and rest… and if work was the closer destination, that’s where I was going to go.

I get to the jobsite, lean my seat back, stretch, take some deep breaths, and close my eyes.  I feel a second wave of energy hit me.  I can do this.  I have five hours here, if I cut my workload down to the barest essentials, I can knock it out in three and head home.  The only thing I absolutely, positively, had to do that day to appease the PHBs was to run an ethernet line from the router to the kitchen.  The two are about fifty feet from each other.  I can do this, I think to myself.

Now, the absolute distance between the two might have only been fifty feet, but within that fifty feet, there were three walls.  Two of which were plaster, one was concrete.  My plan was to go over the first two and around the third.  Still shouldn’t be a big deal.  And I can do it in three hours as long as that’s literally all I have to do today.  I get out my wire-fishing equipment and start feeding the line up into the ceiling.

Let it be known that I truly despise white acoustic ceiling tile.  I’ve come to hate how it never sits right and turns to dust whenever you press it too hard.  Dust that gets in your hair, your eyes, your ears, and your lungs.  I hate this shit when I DON’T have the flu, that day I hated it more.  And oh yes, by now it was most definitely no allergy attack, I for sure had the flu, and I was two hours from home with a car full of company equipment and a project that the PHBs wanted done three weeks ago.  I continue to ceiling-fish the cable across the ceiling, through dust, pipes, insulation, and generally shoddy craftsmanship.  The offices I was working in were unoccupied, so I just trucked through and smashed tiles as needed.

We finally get to the kitchen, home of the aforementioned concrete wall.  Now things get challenging.  Thanks to the rows of industrial refrigerators and stoves, I can neither climb the ladder to where I need to be, nor can I reach the cable without being an acrobat.  Even in my best condition, I would have been risking breaking my neck.  And by now, every time I climb that ladder, I’m aching.  My solution was to climb on top of the refrigerators (which I’m sure would have pissed off some inspector), lay on my back like I was painting the Sistine chapel, and coax the wire along that way.  Which I did, though it seems no one has dusted up there in years, and the dust, mixed with chunks of tile and fiberglass, are starting to stick to the sweat pouring out of me.

But I do it.  I get the wire run to the PC, terminate the cable, plug it in, and I get an IP address.  I’m done.  That’s literally all I came to do, it took forever and my body is screaming at me, but I did it.  I collapse in the chair, take some deep breaths and try to recompose myself before I can grab my tools and head home.

Just then, one of the serfs rushes in and looks at me sternly.  “Sophia wants to see you.”  I’m informed, as if I’d just been summoned to testify before Congress.  The serf rushes off, panicked.

Now, at this point, it’s worth asking exactly who Sophia was.  Sophia was not a PHB.  She was not, actually, a person of any particular significance on the company org chart.  She had a low-level office job and was, quite honestly, one of my problem children.  When I was told that she wanted to see me, I’d assumed she had caught another virus from listening to sketchy internet radio, or loaded another junkware program that was slowing everything down.  I was most certainly NOT going to do any work on her PC today.  The most she could hope for, if it was super urgent, was for me to put her first on my list when I came back next week.  And that was only if it didn’t immediately appear the issue was her fault, which it almost assuredly was.

I start to gather up my tools and pack my bag.  I put the ladder away.  Someone stops me in the hall.  “DID YOU TALK TO SOPHIA?  SHE’S LOOKING FOR YOU!”  I tell them I’ll see her on my way out.  I truly have no idea why everyone is acting like the world will end if I don’t check out this broad’s spyware-ju-jour.

With my bag in hand, I stick my head into Sophia’s office, one of the rooms I’d run the cable through earlier.  She’s standing right were I was working, tapping her foot.  Without so much as a “Hello”, she taps her foot and says “Look at this floor!”.

Are. You. Fucking. KIDDING. ME???  That’s why you called me in here?  THAT’S what has you on some kind of power trip?  Yes, my work had put a fair amount of dust and debris on the floor but the building has a full-time janitorial staff, who clean up far worse messes than that on an hourly basis.

I don’t respond, mostly because by now, I’m stuggling to not pass out, much less make the next words out of my mouth professional.  “LOOK AT THIS FLOOR!” She repeats.  And at this point, I get truly disgusted.  Now, had she asked me nicely if I would clean it up, I would have, even if I felt like death, because courtesy goes a long way with me.  But to yell at me like I’m a toddler, when she has no actual authority over ANYONE, much less me, pisses me the fuck off.  I promptly decide that it’s time I brought out “Fuck ’em All” guy, and told him this bitch was target #1.  But the trick is, due to office politics, I have to do it in such a way that doesn’t allow her to re-tell the story in a light that paints her as the victim.  Because, let’s just say, she’s nothing if not an professional victim.

“See this mess?”

“Yeah, can you believe it?  Boy, I’ll tell you, I absolutely hate these ceiling tiles.”

“There’s dust all over!”

“I know, right?  Let me tell you, this dust is the bane of my existence!  I can’t tell you how many days I go home and have dust caked into my hair and clothing.  Some days I literally walk from the front door into the shower.”

“It’s everywhere!” She’s starting to deflate, frustrated at my refusal to clean up the mess, nor to escalate the argument so she can call for backup.

“You’re telling me!  Why, if I had my way, there’d be a special place in You-Know-Where for whoever invented that stuff.”  I’m making it clear I’m not budging an inch to clean it up.  I’m not even giving her the satisfaction of dropping so much as an H-Bomb to levvy in a complaint about me, either.  My words are friendly and cheerful, my tone is communicating a clear Fuck You.

It dawns on Sophia that the “pissed off lady” routine isn’t phasing me, and that I had bigger problems than a few handfuls of dust on her carpet.  “So… I should probably get Ross in here to vacuum it up?”

“That would be a really good idea.”  I say, ducking out the door.  You know, since Ross makes twice my salary pushing a goddamn vacuum, I don’t mind leaving him to do his work.

And from that day forward, “Fuck em All” guy was given his due respect, because he could have kept me out of that scenario.  I listened to him for the next two days and through the weekend.